Tag Archives: McDonald’s

We’ve Been Stumbled Upon By Stumbleupon.com

Like many bloggers, we like to look at the visitor statistics for our blog. In our case, that’s a combination of the stats which WordPress.com provides, and the wonderful free statistics we get from Statcounter.com.

Since we started RoutingByRumor late last year, we’ve become accustomed to the ebb and flow of traffic to our blog. Weekly traffic patterns are very predictable. Generally speaking, Saturday is the slowest day of the week, followed by Sunday, which is generally only marginally busier. Midweek tends to see the most traffic, and we’ve seen a pronounced drop in traffic during the summer months, particularly in August. It’s so predictable, that we can usually forecast to within a percent or two, what the traffic on any particular day will be. It sort of reminds us of how precisely electric utilities can predict electricity demand, based on day of the week, time of year, outside temperature, wind speed, cloud cover, etc.

We’ve read much into these patterns. We believe that most web surfing, or at least most blog reading, is probably done while at work. Sometimes you can prove this based on the DNS information associated with visitors IP addresses, such as RealBigCorporation.com (a hypothetical example). We see very predictable traffic patterns to each posting on our blog. Certain articles are perennial favorites, while other posts hardly ever muster any readers (a terrible shame, since we can attest to the fact that every single one of our posts are of excellent quality and worthy of your consideration). We never know ahead of time which of our articles will attract lots of traffic, and which ones will live their life in solitary confinement. Perhaps THIS article about Stumbleupon will be a big hit. Then again, maybe not. It’s difficult to predict. Sometimes, events in the news cause a particular article on our blog to explode in popularity for a few days.

If we’ve learned one thing, it’s that the popularity can be very fleeting. Another is that anything you post related to a scandal, public figures in the news, or some dirt being dished about someone, seems to attract many more visitors than any article you can post with any redeeming value. Sadly, the latest piece of trash about Brittany Spears will attract much more traffic than an announcement that you’ve found a cure for cancer, a solution to global warming and the key to world peace. It doesn’t say much about how discerning the average web surfer is, and it’s also probably why supermarket tabloids sell so well. Up until this past weekend, when Stumbleupon opened the floodgates of hell, the most traffic we ever saw at RoutingByRumor was in the days following our posting of this article. What a sad commentary on the human race.

While visitor statistics usually don’t tell us which search engine a visitor used to find us, it’s probably a good bet that it’s usually Google, the 10,000 pound gorilla of search engines. Thanks, Sergey! WordPress alerts Google and other search engines when new content os posted to a blog. It’s kind of scary how fast Google usually indexes our latest posting. Things usually appear to a limited extent in Google results immediately, with a fuller indexing within 24 to 48 hours.

Unless something pops up in the news that is in some way related to one of our articles, there aren’t many surprises. We see some unexplained transient spikes in traffic to certain articles, but that’s generally all. So, we had to do a double take this past weekend, when traffic to a single article on our blog shot up around 10,000 % or about 100 times more than what we normally see. Our first impression was that it was some sort of problem with the stats. It wasn’t. Good thing that WordPress doesn’t charge us for bandwidth usage !!!

What happened ? We had been “stumbled upon” by stumbleupon.com, which we had never heard of. More specifically, a stumbleupon.com member named Bizspotter stumbled this post of ours.

Apparently, Stumbleupon is part search engine, part social networking site, and part viral marketing tool. Wikipedia describes Stumbleupon this way… “StumbleUpon chooses which Web page to display based on the user’s ratings of previous pages, ratings by his/her friends, and by the ratings of users with similar interests“. Sounds like an interesting concept. Similar to how a site like Amazon suggests to you that people who bought this item also bought these other items, or iTunes telling you that people who bought this album also liked these other albums.

The fact of the matter is that it looks to us like Stumbleupon is the crack cocaine of traffic generators. Why do we say this ? Because despite the incredible amount of traffic it sent to our blog in a matter of hours (it was pretty much all over by the next day), it appears that none of those visitors were the least bit interested in reading the article they landed on, or anything else we’ve blogged about. We saw absolutely no increase in click-thrus. That is, once they landed at our site, unlike many visitors who find us via a search engine, these Stumbleupon visitors didn’t stick around, and they didn’t click on any links in the article. Unlike many of the “normal” visitors to RoutingByRumor, they also didn’t read any of our other articles.

So, it appears to us that Stumbleupon serves up relevant traffic much the way that McDonald’s or Burger King serve up health food. A search engine like Google is very good at finding content on the Web that is of interest to someone doing a search. It appears that Stumbleupon does a very poor job of finding content that will interest a particular web surfer. Of course, the Stumbleupon paradigm is new to us. Perhaps there are others with more experience with products like Stumbleupon, who have a different opinion as to it’s value. Based on what we’ve seen, if we were paying for traffic to be referred to our blog, we wouldn’t pay a cent for the “junk” traffic Stumbleupon is sending our way. The sheer number of hits that stumbling a URL can generate are very impressive, but a closer look at the quality of that traffic is utterly disappointing indeed.

It makes you wonder why eBay thought that Stumbleupon was worth the $75 million they paid for it. Probably because anything on the Web these days with a social networking slant (facebook, myspace, youtube, linkedin, etc., etc., ad nauseum) is hot.  But then, eBay thought Skype was worth shelling out at least $2.6 billion for (mere pocket change). Hey, people once ridiculed William Henry Seward for spending two cents per acre for a piece of land called Alaska ! We guess that when you have as much money as eBay, dropping a billion here and a billion there isn’t a big deal.  Besides, have you noticed that most big business deals aren’t measured in terms of millions of dollars anymore, but rather in the billions of dollars.  I don’t think it’s inflation so much as it is proof that wealth is being concentrated more and more in a smaller and smaller percentage of society, certainly in the United States, and no doubt elsewhere.  It’s also a result of the shift in our economy, away from dominance by companies like IBM, AT&T and General Motors, to the new billionaires… The Microsofts, Googles, eBays and WordPresses of the world.  (Oops… how did WordPress slip in there ?)  If it doesn’t end in “.com”, it doesn’t really matter anymore.  But I digress.

Of course, we’re probably just a wee bit out of touch with the masses when it comes to appreciating some of the finer websites the Web has to offer. For instance, we can’t quite understand why anyone with even the slightest semblance of a life would find myspace.com the least bit interesting, but at least a few myspace users would probably disagree with us. Myspace claims to have blown by the 100 million user mark more than two years ago, and we’ve seen reports that more than 250,000 new myspace accounts are created daily. Gee whiz… it’s almost as popular as RoutingByRumor !

On the one hand, we were underwhelmed by Stumbleupon. On the other hand, we know when we’re outnumbered (IYCBEJE**). So, if you liked this article, Stumble It!

– Routing By Rumor

(** IYCBEJE – If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Join ‘Em)

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Filed under Apple, Blogging, Google, iPod, Personal, Routing by Rumor, Wordpress

CVS / Pharmacy Stores Win First Prize In The Shrinking Toilet Paper Contest !

Quite honestly, it shouldn’t surprise anyone.

The CVS / Pharmacy chain of drug / variety stores (a division of CVS Caremark Corporation) was never on our list of places that provide “fair dinkum” value to consumers. That’s too bad, because they have about 6,200 stores in the United States. That makes them almost as ubiquitous as McDonald’s. Many towns have more than one CVS location.

We’re digressing, but come to think about it, McDonald’s doesn’t exactly offer great value for your money either. That’s one of the reasons we don’t eat at McDonald’s. Of course, most of the stuff they sell is so unhealthy that they’re probably doing you a favor by selling (in our opinion) barely edible food. I think we’ve set foot in a McDonald’s one time in the last five years. There must be a correlation between a chain of stores getting very large and offering poor value to consumers. And don’t get us wrong… Burger King, Wendy’s and the others aren’t any better values or (again, in our opinion) any healthier or more palatable.

The high prices at CVS are in line with the prices in convenience stores such as 7-Eleven, albeit with a much larger selection of merchandise. We only rarely walk into a CVS store, to pick up something on sale, and only if we happen to be passing by anyway. But frankly, we’re not careless enough with money to shop there otherwise. If you have a Target, Wal-Mart, K-Mart or other discount store nearby, you’d have to be insane to do much shopping at CVS. Nobody we know ever confused CVS with a discount chain. To make matters even worse, they are often out of stock on the sale items we try to find there. Like many other retailers, they go through the trouble of printing and distributing a weekly sale circular, but don’t seem to be able to have much of what they are advertising in stock. Keep your stinkin’ rainchecks. To us, they seem like a poorly managed company that takes their customers to be a bunch of idiots. We’re amazed they’ve grown as large as they are and manage to stay in business. Then again, there are many horrible retailers (here’s a prime example) that seem to defy the laws of physics by being able to stay in business. Go figure.

We will often find the HIGHEST prices for many different items at CVS. Toilet paper, a favorite topic of this blogger, is no exception. On my last visit to a CVS, they were up to $1.15 for a single role of Scott Tissue’s 1000-sheet roll, which is by far, the highest retail price we’ve seen for Scott toilet paper.

CVS’s store brand of 1000 sheet, single ply toilet paper is now the smallest roll we’ve ever seen in any brand of toilet paper. It boasts a sheet size of 4.3″ x 3.66″. That makes the miniature rolls of Scott Tissue’s 4.5″ x 3.7″ sheets seem huge by comparison.

The reduction in width from 4.5″ to 4.3″ means you’re getting about 5% less paper per roll. But then they added insult to injury, by chiseling 0.04″ off the length of each sheet, compared to what most brands currently measure (after a number of product downsizings).

Really now. 3.66″ instead of 3.7″ ?

How desperate are they getting ?

Now what about the price of CVS brand toilet paper ? Did CVS shrink the price too ?

No such luck. I believe it was selling for 89 cents a roll, which by concidence, is probably the highest price I’ve ever seen for a store-brand roll of toilet paper. But then again, it’s CVS, and I’ve never heard anyone say that the “V” in CVS stands for “value”.

– Routing By Rumor

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Filed under Business, Consumerism, Deception Engineering, Home, Kimberly-Clark, Life, Money, Retail, Retailers, Routing by Rumor, Scams, Scott Tissue, Shopping, Shrinking Products, The Economy, Your Money

Oh Great… Just When I Feel Like Having Arroz Con Pollo, They Announce Rice Rationing !

J. Howard Miller's World War II poster

J. Howard Miller’s (see obituary) World War II era poster

Global warming, mad cow disease, Iraq, disappearing honey bees, $4.00/gallon gasoline, the real estate slump, food riots around the world, a recession here in the U.S. (despite what Washington may be telling you), and now rice rationing ?

Check your calendar. Is it 2008, or 1942 ?

I’ve lost my appetite. Forget the rice. I’m going to buy some Soylent Green. Speaking of Soylent Green, maybe we can have Charlton Heston investigate this rice shortage. Oops, too late.

…And you do need a balanced diet, so get some Soylent Red and Soylent Yellow, too.

You have to wonder why Costco and Wal-Mart (Sam’s Club) would choose to ration rice purchases, rather than let market forces control demand and price. Rationing tends to induce panic buying. This is a bad omen, coming at a time when corn is in short supply because of the demand created by ethanol production.

What’s next ? Sending military advisors to Vietnam, to help the rice paddy farmers ? We’ll call it a “police action”. Maybe they can dust off “Rosie The Riveter” and have her star in a new campaign to eat potatoes, and the government can start issuing rice coupons.

I can see it now… McDonald’s running TV commercials advertising their “Freedom Fries”. Bags of “Patriot Chips” on store shelves. People throwing popcorn at weddings. Boycotts of Chinese restaurants that serve rice. Food manufacturers promoting rice-free products. The price of potatoes quadrupling overnight. Runaway wheat prices. Supermarkets using armored cars to deliver rice to their stores. “Rice lines” at the supermarkets, and “rice riots” in the streets. Soccer moms fighting in the cereal aisle over the last box of Rice Chex. Rice-free Fridays. “Black market” rice. Even/Odd day rice rationing. Flour rationing. Bootlegged rice. $5.00 or $10.00 loaves of bread (which isn’t such a huge jump, since many premium breads now sell for close to $4.00 a loaf). And don’t forget the inevitable Congressional hearings into the rice shortage, with farmers and wholesalers invoking the fifth amendment. Northerners might even discover what Southerners already enjoy, grits. The USO starts an anti-rice campaign, encouraging Americans to send potatoes to servicemen instead, with the catchy phrase… “Send a sack to our boys in Iraq” (inspired by “Send a salami to your boy in the Army” (youtube) …featuring Jerry Lewis at Katz’s Delicatessen, NYC, from “At War With The Army“.) Also see this blogger’s raving about Katz’s Delicatessen, a New York City landmark. (While we’re on the subject of movies and Katz’s Delicatessen, here’s the classic scene from “When Harry Met Sally”, starring Meg Ryan and Billy Crystal. It was also filmed in Katz’s Delicatessen.)

You’re walking down the street, and some guy steps out of a dark alleyway. Pssst… hey bud, youz wants to buy a bag of Basmati, real cheap?

$4.00/gallon gasoline will pale in comparison.

– RoutingByRumor

photo courtesy of Kobako / Wikimedia

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Filed under Business, Consumerism, Energy, Energy costs, Environment, Food, Life, Money, News, Politics, Retail, Retailers, Routing by Rumor, Shopping, The Economy, Uncategorized, Walmart, War, World War II, Your Money

Still Waiting For Your Rebate Check From Eagle Technologies For Products Purchased At Micro Center ? Don’t Hold Your Breath !

WARNING TO CONSUMERS

WE RECOMMEND AGAINST PURCHASING PRODUCTS SOLD OR MARKETED BY THIS COMPANY

THEY HAVE A HISTORY OF DENYING VALID REBATE SUBMISSIONS AND/OR NOT PAYING VALID REBATE CLAIMS IN A TIMELY MANNER

We’ve written previously about the Micro Center chain of computer stores. We’ve also written about companies who play games with consumers when they try to claim a rebate. We like shopping at Micro Center because of their competitive prices and great selection, but we don’t like getting screwed when we try to get a rebate check for something we’ve purchased there. Micro Center needs to stop doing business with manufacturers who make it difficult or impossible to submit and receive rebates for products purchased at Micro Center. We consider a retailer’s advertisement of a product rebate to be a non-revocable contract with the purchaser, and we believe the courts will have the same opinion. Just as you expect to pay the advertised price, you expect to receive the advertised rebate in a reasonable amount of time and without unnecessary hassles.

Back in December 2007, we purchased two different Eagle Tech (Eagle Technologies) products at Micro Center, both of which offered rebates. We should have been suspicious, because the rebate offers had the most complicated and time consuming set of terms we’ve ever seen. To make matters worse, it’s pretty obvious that the people at Eagle Technologies do not have an impressive command of the English language, because the rebate form was full of grammatical errors and obviously writen by someone whose first language was probably Chinese. There are a lot of people in California. Couldn’t they find a native English speaker to proofread their rebate offer?

Here’s a verbatim example of what I’m speaking about…

We are not responsibility for any of non received check, Lost mail, Expired rebate check, Forgot deposit check issues. [sic], [sic], [sic], [sic] and [sic]” !!!

For those who have no idea what all the [sic]s mean, check out this article from Wikipedia.

Eagle Technologies / Eagle Tech is located in City of Industry, California. It’s an unusual place with an unusual name. (As an aside, if you visit the McDonald’s in City of Industry, you won’t be able to get a Big Mac or a Happy Meal. Here’s why!)

Eagle Tech requires you to first file your rebate claim online, then print out a form and mail it using an envelope that you paste their address label and barcode onto. Then you wait for several months while they “age” your claim (like it was a piece of cheese, I suppose), go thru several phases, including “submitted”, “received”, “approved”, “check printed”, etc. Are they joking? Is this a contest or a rebate offer?

Our rule of thumb is that the longer you have to wait, the more hoops you have to jump thru, and the more conditions in a rebate offer, the less likely it is to be legitimate, and the less likely you are to ever see a rebate check. We would certainly advise you not to make he same mistake we made, and to avoid Eagle Tech products, which include their CONSUS, ARION (or maybe it’s ORION), VOLTAS, FORTE, DRAGON and NEPTOR lines of computer products. Certainly don’t buy any of their products if you are depending on a hassle-free rebate experience.

It’s unfortunate that some retailers and manufacturers have to resort to these games. Certainly, there are many ethical companies that offer rebates that are easy to submit, and which are processed promptly. Sadly, Eagle Technologies does not appear to be one of them. So we wait… and hope. Will our rebates eventually arrive, or will Eagle Technologies declare bankruptcy first, as many companies that never fulfill rebates have done in the past, leaving their customers screwed and without recourse.

Here’s another Eagle Technologies customer’s horror story about their rebate experience. And here’s a forum string containing comments from customers who haven’t seen their Eagle Tech rebate checks.

And talk about long waits, that’s exactly what Eagle Technologies will have if they expect us to purchase any of their products again.

File this article under…

Eagle Tech Rebate Rebates

Eagle Tech Computer Rebate Rebates

Eagle Technology Rebate Rebates

Eagle Technologies Rebate Rebates

Micro Center Rebate Rebates

Rebate Fraud

Rebate Scams

Rebate Games

Deceptive Rebate Tactics

Rebate Hell

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Filed under Business, China, Consumerism, Free Stuff, Life, Money, Personal, Personal Tidbits, Rebates, Retail, Retailers, Routing by Rumor, Scams, Shopping, Technology, Your Money