Tag Archives: Rebates

Still Waiting For Your Rebate Check From Eagle Technologies For Products Purchased At Micro Center ? Don’t Hold Your Breath !

WARNING TO CONSUMERS

WE RECOMMEND AGAINST PURCHASING PRODUCTS SOLD OR MARKETED BY THIS COMPANY

THEY HAVE A HISTORY OF DENYING VALID REBATE SUBMISSIONS AND/OR NOT PAYING VALID REBATE CLAIMS IN A TIMELY MANNER

We’ve written previously about the Micro Center chain of computer stores. We’ve also written about companies who play games with consumers when they try to claim a rebate. We like shopping at Micro Center because of their competitive prices and great selection, but we don’t like getting screwed when we try to get a rebate check for something we’ve purchased there. Micro Center needs to stop doing business with manufacturers who make it difficult or impossible to submit and receive rebates for products purchased at Micro Center. We consider a retailer’s advertisement of a product rebate to be a non-revocable contract with the purchaser, and we believe the courts will have the same opinion. Just as you expect to pay the advertised price, you expect to receive the advertised rebate in a reasonable amount of time and without unnecessary hassles.

Back in December 2007, we purchased two different Eagle Tech (Eagle Technologies) products at Micro Center, both of which offered rebates. We should have been suspicious, because the rebate offers had the most complicated and time consuming set of terms we’ve ever seen. To make matters worse, it’s pretty obvious that the people at Eagle Technologies do not have an impressive command of the English language, because the rebate form was full of grammatical errors and obviously writen by someone whose first language was probably Chinese. There are a lot of people in California. Couldn’t they find a native English speaker to proofread their rebate offer?

Here’s a verbatim example of what I’m speaking about…

We are not responsibility for any of non received check, Lost mail, Expired rebate check, Forgot deposit check issues. [sic], [sic], [sic], [sic] and [sic]” !!!

For those who have no idea what all the [sic]s mean, check out this article from Wikipedia.

Eagle Technologies / Eagle Tech is located in City of Industry, California. It’s an unusual place with an unusual name. (As an aside, if you visit the McDonald’s in City of Industry, you won’t be able to get a Big Mac or a Happy Meal. Here’s why!)

Eagle Tech requires you to first file your rebate claim online, then print out a form and mail it using an envelope that you paste their address label and barcode onto. Then you wait for several months while they “age” your claim (like it was a piece of cheese, I suppose), go thru several phases, including “submitted”, “received”, “approved”, “check printed”, etc. Are they joking? Is this a contest or a rebate offer?

Our rule of thumb is that the longer you have to wait, the more hoops you have to jump thru, and the more conditions in a rebate offer, the less likely it is to be legitimate, and the less likely you are to ever see a rebate check. We would certainly advise you not to make he same mistake we made, and to avoid Eagle Tech products, which include their CONSUS, ARION (or maybe it’s ORION), VOLTAS, FORTE, DRAGON and NEPTOR lines of computer products. Certainly don’t buy any of their products if you are depending on a hassle-free rebate experience.

It’s unfortunate that some retailers and manufacturers have to resort to these games. Certainly, there are many ethical companies that offer rebates that are easy to submit, and which are processed promptly. Sadly, Eagle Technologies does not appear to be one of them. So we wait… and hope. Will our rebates eventually arrive, or will Eagle Technologies declare bankruptcy first, as many companies that never fulfill rebates have done in the past, leaving their customers screwed and without recourse.

Here’s another Eagle Technologies customer’s horror story about their rebate experience. And here’s a forum string containing comments from customers who haven’t seen their Eagle Tech rebate checks.

And talk about long waits, that’s exactly what Eagle Technologies will have if they expect us to purchase any of their products again.

File this article under…

Eagle Tech Rebate Rebates

Eagle Tech Computer Rebate Rebates

Eagle Technology Rebate Rebates

Eagle Technologies Rebate Rebates

Micro Center Rebate Rebates

Rebate Fraud

Rebate Scams

Rebate Games

Deceptive Rebate Tactics

Rebate Hell

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eBay – A Buyer’s Market or a Seller’s Market?

ebay.jpg

I love eBay. I hate eBay. I’ve used eBay since 1999.

If you are looking for a hard to find, vintage, used, discontinued or rare item, eBay is the first place to look. If you want to find the latest tech gadget at less than retail, check eBay first. A lot of people won’t even consider buying something online or at a “brick-and-mortar” local retailer without checking the price on eBay first.

With all those “Get Rich Selling On eBay” books and seminars out there, you would think everybody could quit their day job and watch the money pour in when they become an eBay seller. Don’t bet on it. Most eBay sellers hardly make enough to make it worthwhile. When you factor in the amount of time you have to invest to set up an auction, respond to buyer’s questions, deal with deadbeat bidders, and pack & ship the item, and the cost of eBay’s and PayPal’s fees, it’s hard to make a profit. Meg Whitman, eBay’s CEO, and eBay’s stockholders have made fortunes on eBay. If you want to make money on eBay, buy some eBay stock rather than trying to sell on eBay.

eBay has incrementally introduced new features over time that makes it a more secure and useful platform, but eBay has also devolved into an uneven playing field that benefits few but eBay itself. In category after category, you have sellers selling items for pennies, but charging outrageous amounts for “shipping”. Even the majority of sellers who aren’t selling through “Buy-It-Now” auctions for $0.01 are still inflating their shipping charges to try and make some money. This is especially true with sellers from countries like Chins, which have become a larger and larger presence on eBay.

I’ve seen it over and over again… For example, very small items selling for a few pennies, but with a $29.00 shipping fee. Shipping that will cost the seller anywhere from a first-class postage stamp to perhaps a dollar or two. Few buyers or sellers seem to care much about the practice, and eBay is certainly not complaining. There is so much competition between sellers that they all have to resort to this tactic. eBay actually helps sellers inflate their shipping fees by allowing them to build their margin into eBay’s auction shipping charge calculator.

Why is this happening? eBay does not charge a commission (final-value fee) for shipping charges assessed by a seller, so sellers shift all or most of an item’s cost to the shipping fee. eBay appears to have made no serious attempt to curb this practice. Why? I think it’s because eBay also owns PayPal, the bank thru which the vast majority of eBay transactions are paid for. If eBay doesn’t get their cut thru auction fees, it will still earn it’s money through PayPal fees.

If you’re looking for a bargain on the latest high-tech gadget, I doubt you’ll find a bargain on eBay. Items that are in demand usually sell for prices close to retail, especially when you add in the “shipping” charge. Most eBay sellers will not accept returns or issue refunds. Many manufacturers will not honor rebates or warranties on items purchased thru online auctions. While most sellers do a good job of describing an item and it’s condition, some do not. Some are deceptive.

For items like used or out-of-print books or DVDs, eBay is great, and there are many bargains available. I think eBay has done more for the environment by keeping stuff out of landfills than any recycling program has ever done. If you want to get rid of it, don’t throw it out. Put it on eBay.

One of eBay’s strengths is it’s feedback system. I like the very democratic rating system, where buyers get to rate and comment on sellers and vice versa. It encourages people to treat other eBayers they deal with fairly. It also holds you hostage to some extent. You have to avoid giving negative feedback to someone you’ve dealt with, even if it is justified, for fear of receiving retaliatory negative feedback. The feedback system is a double-edged sword.

…When I continue, I’ll discuss some of the issues I’ve touched on in greater detail.

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Still Waiting For That Rebate Check? Don’t Hold Your Breath If Staples, Symantec or Parago Are Involved !

I’m a sucker for almost anything that comes with the promise of a rebate, particularly technology products. The phrase “FREE AFTER REBATE” is music to my ears, even though this is never quite true when you take into consideration the sales tax, postage, and other costs associated with filing the rebate claim.

Rebates were the one saving grace for a retailer that I thought was otherwise worthless, CompUSA. Most of the CompUSA stores in the USA have closed within the past year, and  I suspect they will disappear completely in short order. The funny thing is, I’ve never come across anyone who was sorry that a CompUSA store closed. I’ll usually hear comments like “I can’t believe they lasted as long as they did”.

I’ve been running into a problem receiving rebates I’ve qualified for on a number of products I’ve purchased at Staples stores recently. Most often, they have been rebates on software titles from Symantec. The common thread with all of the rebates I’ve had trouble getting my rebate checks for is that they are fulfilled by a company called Parago. Quite frankly, I have a pretty good nose for this stuff, and I smell a scam. It wasn’t always this way. In the past, Symantec rebate checks always arrived quickly and without a problem. I could always depend on receiving my check within a few weeks, which was much quicker than many other manufacturer’s rebates, but things have changed.

I meticulously follow the requirements of each rebate offer. I’ll include the UPC barcode, proof-of-purchase seal (if applicable), cash register receipts, product registration requirements, proof that I qualify for rebates available only to owners of previous versions or competitive products, etc, etc. I double and triple check everything, including the offer expiration date. Then I make copies of everything I submit. I double check the postage and the addresses.

At least half of the time, I’ll get a postcard from Parago telling me that I did not qualify for the rebate, listing one or more bogus reasons. Funny, but when I check my copy of the material I submitted, I do qualify for the rebate, and I’ve submitted whatever it is that they say was missing from my submission.

Read this: “The Great Rebate Runaround”, published by Businessweek.

Here’s a story about Parago posted by another consumer, who has had the same experience with Parago.

Here’s another.

I’ll call the phone number listed on the postcard, and I’m forced to navigate thru several menus before I can press the appropriate key and speak to a real live human being (or wait on hold until one is available).

Each time I’ve called about a rebate submission that was rejected,  the person taking my  call will take a few seconds to look over whatever records they have on their computer screen, and then announce that it was their mistake, telling me I will receive my rebate in a few weeks. Sure enough, about a month later, my rebate arrives.

What’s going on here? Let me take a guess. I think that either the retailer, in these cases Staples, or the manufacturer, in these cases usually Symantec, or more likely the rebate processor, which in every case has been Parago, has figured out how to make money. Conveniently manufacture a bogus reason to disqualify the rebate claim, and hope that the customer doesn’t pursue the matter. If the customer does complain, just say “oops, our mistake… so sorry… we’ll get that check out to you in a few weeks”. If this is indeed what is happening, it’s fraud, and it’s a crime. Could you imagine how much money is at stake if even a small percentage of the rebate submissions never get paid out? And this is on top of the fact that most rebates are never claimed by consumers to begin with.

Here’s an article on zdnet.com, that discusses the fact that Parago has actually patented ways to reduce the number of rebates it has to pay out to consumers. This is disgusting. It’s like being admitted to a hospital that has patented ways of killing it’s patients. It’s like a restaurant that tries to give their customers an empty plate. You can’t get away with it for very long. I think the fulfillment industry is going to destroy itself, just as the telemarketing industry did, by abusing the public to the point that legislation was passed which created the U.S. Government’s Do-Not-Call list. Americans who were sick and tired of being harassed by telemarketers have placed almost 150 million phone numbers on the DNC Registry. Telemarketers killed the goose that laid the golden egg. They have nobody to blame but themselves. The government recently decided to make DNC list registrations permanent. Good !

It appears to me that job #1 at rebate processors like Parago is not to get your rebate check to you quickly. Rather, their first and highest priority seems to be finding any way possible to avoid honoring a rebate offer. Who in their right mind would want to do business with a company whose goal, it seems,  is to cheat you out of what they owe you? If a lot of companies offering rebates were being honest with their customers, I think their products would carry stickers such as this…

“$50 MAIL-IN REBATE, BUT WE WILL DO EVERYTHING WE CAN TO ENSURE THAT YOU WON’T QUALIFY FOR THE REBATE”.

Manufacturers or retailers who employ rebate processors that attempt to prevent as many consumers as possible from collecting their rebates are shortsighted indeed. It’s not the consumer who stands to be hurt the most by these practices. It’s the manufacturers themselves, and the rebate fulfillment companies who are destroying the consumer’s trust in rebate promotions. Successful companies don’t have to pinch their customers to make a profit.  Throwing up as many barriers as you can, forcing your customer to jump thru hoops and clear hurdles before they will get their rebate is simply not good business.  These types of practices are a sign of greed or desperation, by companies that are willing to sacrifice future income and goodwill in the name of a fast buck.  It’s simply not the way an ethical company operates.

Now I know what you’re saying. You’re saying “why should we believe anything that RoutingByRumor says. Who the hell is RoutingByRumor anyway?” In that case, don’t take my word for it. Parago holds at least five U.S. patents, which can be viewed here. Among them is Patent # 7,146,328, which contains a number of claims, including the following…

“Rebates offer cash back to consumers who fulfill a set of requirements after purchasing a product bearing a rebate. By requiring post-purchase activities, the rebate offerer attempts to reduce the number of successful rebate claimants. Breakage occurs when a product bearing a rebate is sold, but the rebate is not successfully claimed.”

“Breakage refers to any event that prevents a rebate transaction from being completed, for example, denying based on bad verification materials such as receipts or UPC symbols, denying based on improper purchase dates or purchase price, or slippage from checks issued but not cashed.”

The patent also boasts that Parago’s system “provides opportunities for breakage”. Based on my experiences with Parago, I’m surprised it doesn’t say that their system “guarantees that breakage will occur”.

I have sent complaints to both Staples and Symantec about the difficulties I’ve had with rebates processed by Parago. Sadly, but not surprisingly, neither Staples or Symantec responded to my complaints. My guess is that retailers like Staples, and their vendors, such as Symantec, actually want Parago to mail out as few rebate checks as possible. If this is not the case, then they need to contract with a different fulfillment company. In my opinion, if companies like Staples and Symantec are involved in this practice in an attempt to avoid having to pay valid rebate claims, they should be prosecuted. I believe that a rebate offer is a contract between the buyer and the party offering the rebate. A class action lawsuit might be in order. Perhaps it’s time to stop buying products offering rebates.

If Parago CEO Juli Spottiswood (see nbpca article), Staples CEO Ron Sargent (see Forbes article), or Symantec CEO John Thompson (see Forbes article) wish to comment on this article, RoutingByRumor will post their comments here. If you click on the links to the Forbes articles above, you can see the incredible compensation these CEOs receive, made possible by your purchases and by all those rebates you thought you were getting, but never received.

If you have experienced this or similar problems trying to collect a rebate, post the details of your experience here, or e-mail them to me. If I receive a response to my complaints to Staples or Symantec, I will post the details, but I’m not holding my breath.

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